This system works all over the walls of the Gallo-Roman house.

The temples …. notice on the temples The Gallo-Roman gods in the hall of the museum dedicated to the gods we understood that the Gallo-Romans were polytheists; they worshiped the Greek, Roman, Egyptian deities, Gallic and made their offerings: animal parts such as pork, beef or lamb. Etienne and Ginger Heading week I met an old friend, then I will relax at the spa Les Thermes … They are located in low-cons of the oppidum (a stronghold on a hill).

They are currently not visible as they are in public amenities that were built before the law of salvage the remains. The baths are public baths with hot pools, cold or lukewarm. Cold baths are called frigidarium, hot baths and warm baths caldarium tepidarium.

Only a few stones were saved. Some of the stones are now in the museum. Thomas and Yann And distract me from the fountain … The fountain The fountain feeds 6000 people with water.

It is rectangular. The pillars that held it were engraved graffiti in Latin. The stone basin rests on a layer of clay that prevents water from dispersing in the surroundings. The fountain is dug three meters deep underground. It was built before the amphitheater.

Sarah A friend invited me to lunch … In Roman cuisine Roman cuisine there is furniture that are exposed pots. On a shelf are placed cups and utensils.

One can also find a wheel to grind grain for example. The work plan includes the above a heated plate by wood to cook food and a supply of wood underneath. There is a table with chairs and a wicker pram.

Anthony and Nathan Food The Gallo-Romans ate mainly: – They ate a lot of starchy foods: lentils, peas … – Cereals and vegetables: carrots, cabbage … It also ate meat – they ate pork, cow, but do not eat wild boar because this animal was worshiped as a god. – They were fond of seafood: oysters … Seasonings and beverages: – They seasoned their dishes with oil and garum. – They drank water, wine.

Invention: They invented a system to give milk for babies: the mechanism was to butcher a hole so after a glass bottle, to prevent milk to flow too quickly and release the pressure so that the milk can flow through another hole at the other end. This allowed to give Gallo-Romans to drink the child dosing. Valentin and Kevin I go to the market and paid with my money … (Article) All along the walls …

The Gallic walls: The Gauls have built walls in a deep ditch of 10 meters, to protect against invasions Roman. In this gap, there remained passages that Gaul can circulate. We could see this wall and we saw that if we touch that wall (you are allowed to touch) it crumbles under the fingers. Steven and Jeremy I’ll cry my ancestors in the cemetery … The necropolis The dead were cremated except infants who had not yet their teeth and people with deformities.

We put a coin in the mouth of the deceased to pay for their passage in the “other world.” Beside the body was burned objects relating to the profession of death or toys for children and youth. If he had a pet (dog, cat) is burned to keep him company. To celebrate the death of the deceased, his family invited his friends for a big banquet.

His ashes were placed in an urn was placed in the necropolis. To protect the soul of the statues of deities were placed near the urn. Bastien and Thomas to go home, I press the lock on the door and I asked my servant to put wood to heat the house …

Heating Some Gallo-Roman houses belonging to very rich people are heated by a fireplace logs fed by a slave which is accommodated near the oven. To spread the heat, the pipes scattered throughout the house between two parts of the wall. This system works all over the walls of the Gallo-Roman house.

Sebastian I reach the end of my book to write, I took notes on tablets, the ones I used when I was discipulus (student) The Roman School: The professor said magister in Latin . Students attend school from twelve. On tablets covered wooden beeswax, they wrote with wooden stylus. The tablet was approximately 20cm long and 10cm wide.

She stood vertically. The stylus is about 10cm in length. The stylus was all fine. To clear the students rebouchaient holes with the flat part of the stylus.

We tried to write on the tablets, and we concluded that it was not difficult if you pressed the pen. To see what we had written were to guide the tablet into the light. Emeline, Clemence and Constance 2009-2010
1 result Results I got started in children’s art In: The children’s art educator CEL For teachers review Arts> Visual Arts February 1971 Author: Robert Faulon
2 Results BT No.

100: Ecole Buissonniere In BT CEL For students review Movements> Freinet movement> publication (s) February 1950 Working Library 100 More BT No. 807: children speak of art in BT CEL For students> elementary For students> College Arts magazine in June 1975 Read more
1 to 10 from 254 results BT No. 70 – The date palm In BT Publishing Printing at the School For students book, brochure April 1949 More BT No.

69 – In Grenoble: BT Publishing Printing at the School for students book, brochure March 1949 Authors: Alberthe Raoul Faure and Faure more BT No. 68 – Trade and Industry in the Middle Ages: BT Publishing Printing to School for students book, brochure March 1949 more BT 67 – potash Alsace in BT Publishing Printing at the School for students book, brochure March 1949 more BT No.

66 – Ogni Eskimo child in Greenland: BT Publishing Printing at the School for students book, brochure March 1949 Author: Irene Bonnet more BT No. 65 – the headpieces in France: BT Publishing Printing to School for students book, brochure February 1949 Author: Delage more BT No.

64 – History of a jet rms In BT Publishing Printing at the School For students book, brochure February 1949 Author: Alfred Carlier More BT 63 – History baker In BT Publishing Printing to School for students book, brochure January 1949 Author: Alfred Carlier more BT No. 62 – the mole in BT Publishing Printing at the School for students book, brochure December 1948 more BT No.

61 – the island of Ouessant (Enez-Eussa) in BT Publishing Printing at the School for students book, brochure December 1948 Read more 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 … next> last »
how to get answers for homework
Beyond the censorship hackers in newspapers: The Educator For teachers teaching journal Principles> Communication> school newspaper in May 1985 This article is taken from the magazine of the Belgian Movement Modern School. This explains some references to a designated grade levels different from ours.

Author: Jean Dumont More To vary our approach to things – the problems of file In: The Educator For teachers review Math> Logic Maths Teaching Techniques> Tools> File January 1984 Author: Jean Dumont More About conferences students in: the Educator CEL for teachers teaching journal Principles> educational Techniques communication> exposed children conference in April 1977 A new extension testimony from those published gradually last year. Author: Jean Dumont More Parents and school In: The parents Educator CEL For teachers review in June 1976 Authors: Jacques Dumont and Jean Le Du Read more How do I use the FTC In: The Educator CEL for teachers journal Science and Techno teaching Techniques> tools> teaching Techniques file> tools May 1975 About the series “100 basic experiences” (One must identify to access the file) Author: Jean Dumont more the educational Records the Educator No. 83-84: “ecology and children” in: Company> ecology teaching of Educator CEL Records for teachers journal Science and Techno> life Sciences and Earth in June 1973 Introduction CM2 students work in their forest …. ………..

Deja un comentario

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *